Storage Tanks

SPCC and AST Installation Considerations

Installation Setbacks & SPCC applicability

Know your installation limitations.   

 

Tank Info Setback to Drinking Water Prohibited Locations
Double Walled AST

400 feet - UPGRADIENT  from any drinking water well (public & private) 

&

200 feet Downgradient from any drinking water well (public & private) 

No AST systems shall be installed after the effective date of the regulations in this chapter in the following locations:
(a)(1) Within a wetland or within five hundred feet of a wetland boundary;
(2) Within five hundred feet of inland waters;
(3) Within five hundred feet of the shoreline (as measured from the mean high water mark);
(4) Within tidal or storm water inundation areas.
 
Single Walled AST 500 feet, upgradient OR downgradient from any drinking water well (public & private)  No AST systems shall be installed after the effective date of the regulations in this chapter in the following locations:
(a)(1) Within a wetland or within five hundred feet of a wetland boundary;
(2) Within five hundred feet of inland waters;
(3) Within five hundred feet of the shoreline (as measured from the mean high water mark);
(4) Within tidal or storm water inundation areas.
 

 

SPCC Applicability

Is the total aggregate aboveground oil storage capacity greater than 1,320 gallons of oil?   If Yes, then you need to prepare and implement a site-specific Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan

 

To calculate the capacity of your containers, use the shell capacity of the container (maximum volume) and not the actual amount of product stored in the container (operational volume).  Count only containers with storage capacity equal to or greater than 55 gallons.

https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2013-08/documents/qf_app_guidance_0.pdf

The major components of the SPCC are:

  1. Secondary containment and other engineered and procedural control measures.
  2. Operating procedures, inspections and other administrative measures.
  3. Countermeasures and cleanup measures. 

You’ll need to include the following information in your SPCC Plan:

  • A list of the oil containers at the facility including the contents and location of each container;
  • A brief description of the procedures that you will use to prevent oil spills. For example, steps you use to transfer fuel from a storage tank to a vehicle that reduce the possibility of a fuel spill;
  • A brief description of the measures you installed to prevent oil from reaching water;
  • A brief description of the measures you will use to contain and cleanup an oil spill; and
  • A list of emergency contacts and first responders.

Include the following spill prevention measures in the SPCC Plan and implement them at your facility:

  • Use containers suitable for the oil stored. For example, use a container designed for flammable liquids to store gasoline;
  • Identify contractors or other local personnel who can help you clean up an oil spill;
  • Provide overfill prevention for your oil storage containers. You could use a high-level alarm or audible vent;
  • Provide effective, sized secondary containment for bulk storage containers, such as a dike or a remote impoundment. The containment must be able to hold the full capacity of the container plus possible rainfall. The dike may be constructed of earth or concrete. A double-walled tank may also suffice;
  • Provide effective, general secondary containment to address the most likely discharge where you transfer oil to and from containers and for mobile refuelers, such as fuel nurse tanks mounted on trucks or trailers. For example, you may use sorbent materials, drip pans or curbing for these areas; and
  • Periodically inspect and test pipes and containers. You should visually inspect aboveground pipes and inspect aboveground containers following industry standards. You must “leak test” buried pipes when they are installed or repaired. Keep a written record of your inspections.

 

SPCC Plan must be:

  • kept on site &
  • made available

 

 

Qualified facility

Tier I

If the total aboveground oil storage capacity is 10,000 gallons or less and Since operations your facility has not had:

  • A single discharge of oil to navigable waters or adjoining shorelines exceeding 1,000 gallons, or
  • Two discharges of oil to navigable waters or adjoining shorelines each exceeding 42 gallons within any 12- month period

AND THE FACILITY HAS …

No individual aboveground oil containers greater than 5,000 gallons; THEN your facility is a Tier I Qualified Facility.  This means you can complete and self-certify your SPCC Plan. 

Tier II

If the total aboveground oil storage capacity is 10,000 gallons or less and since operations your facility has not had:

  • A single discharge of oil to navigable waters or adjoining shorelines exceeding 1,000 gallons, or
  • Two discharges of oil to navigable waters or adjoining shorelines each exceeding 42 gallons within any 12- month period

AND THE FACILITY HAS … Any individual aboveground oil container greater than 5,000 gallons;

THEN your facility is a Tier II Qualified Facility.  This means you can complete and self-certify your SPCC Plan, with all applicable requirements of §112.7 and subparts B or C of the rule. 

 

 

TEMPLATES ARE AVAILABLE AT   SPCC elements   Generic/Blank SPCC Plan  and USEPA  www.epa.gov/oilspill

 

Professional Engineer (PE) Certified SPCC Plans

If your facility does not qualify as either a Tier I or Tier II qualified facility, then you must follow the requirements of 40 CFR 112.7 and subparts B or C of the rule, and have the SPCC Plan certified by a PE.

 

A PE must also be involved when you deviate from any of the SPCC requirements (i.e., either by providing environmentally equivalent alternatives or a contingency plan instead of secondary containment). You can still self-certify the SPCC Plan, if your facility is a Tier I or II qualified facility but the deviation must be certified by a PE.

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Last Updated 8/28/2017 2:43:20 PM